8.5. Ansible Playbook Examples

The following sections contain examples of Ansible playbooks which follow the guidelines.

8.5.1. Guidelines for Playbooks to properly integrate with APPC/SDN-C

NOTE: To support concurrent requests to multiple VNF instances of same or different type, VNF files dynamically created by playbooks with VNF specific default values are kept or created in separate directories.

VNF inventory hosts file names include the VNF instance name and are now created under base inventory directory to preserve properties of (global) inventory/group_vars files with variables, example, site specific attributes for DNS, NTP, etc.

Example of an Ansible command (after pwd) to run playbook again vfdb9904v VNF instance:

$ pwd
/storage/vfdb/V16.1/ansible/configure
$ ansible-playbook -i ../inventory/vfdb9904vhosts site.yml --extra-vars "vnf_instance=vfdb9904v"

NOTE: To preserve Ansible inventory/group_vars capability, that makes
group_vars contents global variables available to all playbooks, when they
reside in the inventory directory, guidelines are being updated to name the
VNF inventory hosts file as (a flat file) <VNFName>hosts, stored in the
inventory directory, not a subdirectory under inventory. In the above
example: vfdb9904vhosts (removed / VNF name and hosts vfdb9904/vhosts)

Example of corresponding APPC/SDN-C API Call from ONAP – Ansible Server Specifications:

Using a curl request simulating a Rest API POST requesting execution of configure Playbook (using playbook relative path):

curl -u APIUser:APIPassword -H "Content-type:application/json" -X POST
-d '{"Id": "8412", "PlaybookName": "vfdb/V5.x.x/ansible/configure/site.yml",
"Timeout":"600", "EnvParameters": { "vnf_instance": "vfdb9904v" }}'
http://ansible.server.com:5000/Dispatch

Rest API GET request to obtain response/results for prior request (same ID as POST request above):

curl -u APIUser:APIPassword -H 'Content-type: application/json' -X GET
'http://ansible.server.com:5000/Dispatch/?Id=8412&Type=GetResult'

Comments:

  • An ID number is assigned to each request. This ID number is used to track request down to completion and provide status to APPC/SDN-C when requested.
  • Playbook Name relative path provided in the request as PlaybookName.
  • Ansible Server Rest API is aware of playbook’s root directory which may vary from instance to instance or Ansible Server cluster to cluster.

Ansible Playbooks will use the VNF instance name (passed using –extra-vars “vnf_instance=vfdb9904v”) to identify other default values to run the playbook(s) against the target VNF instance. Same example as above:

$ ansible-playbook -i ../inventory/vfdb9904vhosts site.yml --extra-vars "vnf_instance=vfdb9904v"

Each Ansible Server or cluster is assigned its own identification to be used to authenticate to VNF VMs using Ansible Server or cluster specific set of SSH keys that may be rotated regularly. Here a hosts file, without any SSH key credentials, to run ansible-playbook listed in this example above (IP addresses were scrubbed):

$ more ../inventory/vfdb9904vhosts
[host]
localhost ansible_connection=local

[oamvip]
1xx.2yy.zzz.108

[oam]
1xx.2yy.zzz.109
1xx.2yy.zzz.110

[rdb]
1xx.2yy.zzz.105
1xx.2yy.zzz.106

[wp0ny:children]
oam
rdb

Virtual IP addresses that can be used by multiple VMs, usually, used by the active VM of an active-standby pair, are placed under a group named after the VNFC (VM) type, plus “vip” string, example of such a group name “oamvip”. Also new on this release, an inventory hosts file site (group) with all groups as children (see last three lines in above example), to load site specific variables like NTP, DNS IP addresses, and other site specific variables, making them global variables to be used by playbooks, namely, configure playbook.

NOTE: APPC/SDN-C requests to run Playbooks/Cookbooks target a specific VNF instance, but could be limited to one VM or one type of VM by the request parameters. Actions that may impact a site (LCP), a service, or an entire platform must be orchestrated by MSO in order to execute requests via APPC/SDN-C which then invoke VNF level playbooks. Playbooks that impact more than a single VNF instance are not the current focus of these guidelines.

Creating group_vars sub-directories in the same directory that contains the command/action main playbook, while following Ansible standards, to auto load these variables as global variables is supported as are the majority of Ansible standard capabilities.

Certain VNF Type global variables, for example site specific variables, were moved under inventory/group_vars files in the Beijing release. This way those variables and respective values are available to all playbooks without being explicitly referenced through an include vars statement. Also creating templates that are VNF Type specific, but moving away from static files that are VNF instance specific.

Any remaining VNF instance specific variables that cannot be obtained from A&AI or other sources that still need to be created or edited manually, in advance of VNF instantiation, shall be created under ansible/vars directory. Recommendation is to use JSON files, explicitly referenced by the playbooks, for this purpose, example: <VNF_instance_name>.json.

Example of playbook task explicitly referencing a VNF instance specific json file and loading the contents as global variables:

$ cat site.yml
---

...

- name: get json vars
  hosts: localhost
  gather_facts: False
  tasks:
    - name: json attributes and values
      include_vars: "../vars/{{ vnf_instance }}.json"

- name: show variables
  hosts: localhost
  gather_facts: False
  roles:
    - debug
...

$ ls -1 ../vars
vfdb9904v.json
vfdb9905v.json
vfdb9906v.json
vfdb9907v.json
vfdb9908v.json

Parameters like VNF names, VNFC names, OA&M IP addresses will be extracted from the inventory database (A&AI) by APPC/SDN-C and then passed down to Ansible Server in a NodeList attribute, as part of APPC/SDN-C request through REST API. The Ansible Server Rest API uses the NodeList contents and InventoryNames parameter to build the inventory hosts file for the request, according to VNF playbook design needs, with or without VM or VNFC names. For parameterized playbooks, attribute-value pairs passed down by APPC/SDN-C to Ansible Server, always takes precedence over template or VNF instance specific defaults stored in defaults file(s) as they are made part of the ansible-playbook run command’s "—extra-vars" list.

Example:

$ pwd
/storage/vfdb/latest/ansible
Again, originated from previously re-factored playbooks now being phased out:

$ more vars/vfdb9904v/default_args.yml

vm_config_oam1_vnfc_name: vfdb9904vm001oam001
vm_config_oam1_hostname: vfdb9904vm001
vm_config_oam1_provider_ip_address: 1xx.2yy.zzz.109

vm_config_oam2_vnfc_name: vfdb9904vm002oam001
vm_config_oam2_hostname: vfdb9904vm002
vm_config_oam2_provider_ip_address: 1xx.2yy.zzz.110

vm_config_rdb1_vnfc_name: vfdb9904vm003rdb001
vm_config_rdb1_hostname: vfdb9904vm003
vm_config_rdb1_provider_ip_address: 1xx.2yy.zzz.105

vm_config_rdb2_vnfc_name: vfdb9904vm004rdb001
vm_config_rdb2_hostname: vfdb9904vm004
vm_config_rdb2_provider_ip_address: 1xx.2yy.zzz.106

vm_config_rdb3_vnfc_name: vfdb9904vm005rdb001
vm_config_rdb3_hostname: vfdb9904vm005
vm_config_rdb3_provider_ip_address: 1xx.2yy.zzz.xxx

vm_config_rdb4_vnfc_name: vfdb9904vm006rdb001
vm_config_rdb4_hostname: vfdb9904vm006
vm_config_rdb4_provider_ip_address: 1xx.2yy.zzz.yyy

One of the first tasks on the Ansible Playbooks is to combine the VNF type generic templates, stored on the Ansible Server with playbooks, with the overriding parameters passed down from APPC/SDN-C, to create the VNF instance specific set of attribute-value pairs to be used for the run, in INI format.

Here is an excerpt from such a file that should look somewhat similar to ENV files:

$ more tmp/vfdb9904v/all.yml

deployment_prefix: vfdb9904v
...
timezone: Etc/UTC
...
template_version: '2014-10-16'
stack_name: vfdb9904v
c3dbtype: OAM
stackName: vfdb9904v
juno_base: true
...

# logins list contains ‘login name’, ‘login group’, ‘login password’

logins:
- { name: 'm99999', group: 'm99999', password: 'abcdefgha' }
- { name: 'gsuser', group: 'gsuser', password: ' abcdefgha' }
- { name: 'peruser', group: 'peruser', password: ' abcdefgha' }
- { name: 'dbuser', group: 'dbuser', password: ' abcdefgha' }

NOTE: Arguments passed by APPC/SDN-C to Ansible Server to run a playbook take precedence over any defaults stored in Ansible Server.

8.5.2. Ansible Playbooks – Notes On Artifacts Required to Run Playbooks

Inventory hosts file: should be VNF instance specific.

Default variables: should be VNF instance specific.

Playbooks and paths to referenced files: Playbooks shall not use absolute paths in include or import entries (variables or playbooks) or other types of references.

For this to work properly, when running playbooks, the directory where the main playbook resides shall be the current directory.

Playbook imports, when used, shall use paths relative to the main playbook directory.

Root directory named ansible - Any files provided with playbooks, included, imported, or referenced by playbooks, shall reside under the ansible playbooks (root) directory, containing all playbook subdirectories, or below that ansible root directory, in other subdirectories to support on-boarding and portability of VNF collection of playbooks and related artifacts.

Designing for a shared environment, concurrently running playbooks, targeting multiple VNF instances – inventory hosts file:

To avoid inventory hosts file overwrites or collisions between multiple concurrently running VNF instance requests, chosen approach is for each VNF instance hosts file, to be stored under the Ansible Server Playbooks root directory, under the inventory subdirectory, on an inventory hosts file named after the VNF instance, as follows:

ansible/inventory/<VNF_instance_name>hosts

Example of inventory hosts file path, relative to ansible playbooks (ansible) root directory (playbooks_dir):

ansible/inventory/vnfx0001vhosts

Designing for a shared environment, concurrently running multiple playbooks, targeting multiple VNF instances – default argument variables for specific VNF instances:

VNF instance specific files referenced/included by playbooks, containing default values, example, default_args.yml, shall be stored under a directory with VNF instance name on the path (backwards compatibility) or contain VNF instance name as part of the name.

Example:

ansible/vars/<VNF_instance_name>/default_args.yml

Example of include statement:

include_vars: ../vars/{{ vnf_instance }}/default_args.yml

Example – all in vars directory:

ansible/vars/<VNF_instance_name>default_args.yml

Example of include statement without vars subdirectory:

include_vars: ../vars/{{ vnf_instance }}default_args.yml

Again, this has originated from previously re-factored playbooks, now being phased out. Direction is to move away from having to create VNF instance specific files with VNF instance default variables whenever possible. Moving to extract these values from inventory databases and provide them to Ansible Server as part of APPC/SDN-C request, but may be used in a transition from having everything stored in the Ansible Server to APPC/SDN-C extracting and providing VNF instance specific attribute-value pairs to the Ansible Server as part of the request.

Files containing attribute name value pairs (variable name and default values), referenced/included by playbooks – created dynamically by playbooks:

To avoid overwrites or collisions of multiple concurrently running VNF instance requests, files created dynamically by playbooks, based on VNF generic templates, combined with default values and arguments passed down by APPC/SDN-C (as part of the request), shall be stored under a directory with VNF instance name on the path.

Example:

tmp/<VNF_instance_name>/all.yml

Files containing site specific (Openstack location non-instance specific) attribute name value pairs, like NTP server and DNS server’s IP addresses and other parameters, referenced/included by playbooks, not VNF specific – Could/should be stored under inventory/group_vars directory, in a subdirectory named after the string used to identify the site (nyc1, lax2,…).

Examples:

ansible/inventory/group_vars/<Site>

ansible/inventory/group_vars/wp0ny

ansible/inventory/group_vars/la0ca

Ansible Server Design - Directory Structure

To help understanding the contents of this section, here are few basic definitions:

VNF type a.k.a VNF Function Code - Based on current naming convention, each Virtual Network Function is assigned a 4 character string (example vfdb), these are 4 characters in the VNF instance name, followed by (4) numbers, ending in a “v”, but the naming convention is evolving to include geographical location. VNF instance name in some cases corresponds to the stack name for the VNF when VNF instance is built based on a single module, single stack. Example of VNF instance name: vfdb9904v. All VNF performing this function, running the same software, coming from the same VNF provider will have the same 4 characters in the VNF instance name, in this example, vfdb.

NOTE: New naming convention includes a prefix indicating geographical location where VNF is instantiated.

VNF type, determined through these 4 characters, is also known as VNF Function Code. All VNF Function Codes can be found in A&AI as well as other Network Design Documents.

Version – VNF software version is the release of the software running on the VNF for which the playbooks were developed. VNF configuration steps may change from release to release and this <Version> in the path will allow the Ansible Server to host playbooks associated with each software release. And run the playbooks that match the software release running on each VNF instance. APPC/SDN-C does not support playbook versioning only latest playbook is supported or a hard coded version that later should become a variable to allow multiple actively, in use, playbook versions,to be picked according to VNF release/version.

Playbook Function - A name associated with a life cycle management task(s) performed by the playbook(s) stored in this directory. It should clearly identify the type of action(s) performed by the main playbook and possibly other playbooks stored in this same directory. Ideally, playbook function would match APPC/SDN-C corresponding command or function that is performed by the main playbook in this directory. Following Ansible naming standards main playbook is usually named site.yml. There can be other playbooks on the same directory that use a subset of the roles used by the main playbook site.yml. Examples of Playbook Function directory names(matching APPC/SDN-C command name in lowercase):

  • configure – Contains post-instantiation (bulk) configuration playbook(s), roles,…
  • healthcheck – Contains VNF health check playbook(s), roles,…
  • stop – Contains VNF application stop (stopApplication) playbook(s), roles,…
  • start – Contains VNF application start (startApplication) playbook(s), roles,…
  • configbackup – Contains VNF configuration backup (ConfigBackup) playbook(s), roles,…
  • configrestore – Contains VNF configuration restore (ConfigBackup) playbook(s), roles,…
  • configmodify – Contains VNF configuration modification (ConfigModify) playbook(s), roles,…
  • configscaleout – Contains VNF scale-out configuration/reconfiguration (ConfigBackup) playbook(s), roles,…
  • quiescetraffic – Contains VNF traffic graceful drain/quiesce (QuiesceTraffic) playbook(s), roles,…
  • resumetraffic – Contains VNF resume/restore traffic (ResumeTraffic) playbook(s), roles,…
  • upgradeprecheck – Contains VNF current (old) SW version check (UpgradePreCheck) playbook(s), roles,…
  • upgradebackup – Contains VNF backup prior to SW upgrade (UpgradeBackup) playbook(s), roles,…
  • upgradesoftware – Contains VNF SW upgrade (UpgradeSoftware) playbook(s), roles,…
  • upgradepostcheck – Contains VNF upgraded (new) SW version check (UpgradePostCheck) playbook(s), roles,…
  • upgradebackout – Contains VNF (SoftwareUpgrade) back out (UpgradeBackout) playbook(s), roles,…

Directory structure to allow hosting multiple version sets of playbooks, for the same VNF type, to be hosted in the runtime environment on the Ansible Servers. Generic directory structure:

Ansible Playbooks – Function directory and main playbook:

<VNF type>/<Version>/ansible/<Playbook Function>/site.yml

Example – Post-instantiation (bulk) configuration – APPC/SDN-C Function - Configure:

<VNF type>/<Version>/ansible/configure/site.yml

Example – Post-instantiation (bulk) configuration – APPC/SDN-C Function – Configure – VNF software version 16.1:

vfdb/V16.1/ansible/configure/site.yml

Example – Health-check - APPC/SDN-C Function - HealthCheck:

<VNF type>/<Version>/ansible/healthcheck/site.yml

OR (Function directory name is not required to match APPC/SDN-C function name exactly)

<VNF type>/<Version>/ansible/check/site.yml

Ansible Directories for other artifacts – VNF inventory hosts file - Required:

<VNF type>/<Version>/ansible/inventory/<VNF instance name>hosts

NOTE: Default groups, in inventory hosts file, will be created based on VNFC type (represented by 3 characters) in VNFC name. Example: “oam”, “rdb”, “dbs”, “man”, “iox”, “app”,…

Ansible Directories for other artifacts – VNF instance specific default arguments – Optional:

<VNF type>/<Version>/ansible/vars/<VNF instance name>.json (Preferred)

OR

<VNF type>/<Version>/ansible/vars/<VNF instance name>.yml
(INI format accepted/supported by Ansible)

NOTE: Requirement remains while manual actions to create or edit VNF or PNF instance specific files are supported. All files manually created or edited should be placed in this one directory (ansible/vars).

Ansible Directory for site specific attribute-value pairs (in INI format) - VNF Site files::

<VNF type>/<Version>/ansible/inventory/group_vars/<Site name>

Ansible Directories for other artifacts – VNF (special) other files – Optional – Example – License file:

<VNF type>/<Version>/ansible/<Other directory(s)>

CAUTION: On referenced files used/required by playbooks.

  • To avoid missing files, during on-boarding or uploading of Ansible Playbooks and related artifacts, all permanent files (not generated by playbooks as part of execution), required to run any playbook, shall reside under the ansible root directory or below on other subdirectories.
  • Any references to files, on includes or other playbook entries, shall use relative paths.
  • This is the ansible (root) directory referenced on this note (Ansible Server mount point not included):
<VNF type>/<Version>/ansible/

There is a soft link to the latest set of Ansible Playbooks for each VNF type. This will be deprecated with (A&AI) inventory support for VNF version.

VNF type directories use A&AI inventory VNF function code. Ansible Playbooks will be stored on a Cinder Volume mounted on the Ansible Servers as /storage that is used as a local cache for playbooks and other related artifacts cloned or pulled (updates) from central (git) repository.

Example:

/storage/vfdb/latest/ansible – This soft link point to the latest set of playbooks (or the only set)

/storage/vfdb/V16.1/ansible – Root directory for database VNF Ansible Playbooks for release 16.1

CAUTION: To support this directory structure as the repository to store Ansible Playbooks run by APPC/SDN-C, APPC/SDN-C API in the Ansible Server side needs to be configured to run playbooks from directory, not MySQL database as was the case in the original Ansible proof-of-concept.

Ansible Server HTTP will be configured to support APPC/SDN-C REST API requests to run playbooks as needed, against specific VNF instances, or specific VM(s) as specified in the request(pending APPC/SDN-C tests and implementation details to target single VM in VNF).

APPC/SDN-C REST API to Ansible Server is documented separately and can be found under ONAP (onap.org).

8.5.3. Ansible Inventory Hosts File – Supported Formats

Supported inventory hosts file examples, built from this NodeList model, extracted from A&AI by APPC/SDN-C and passed to the Ansible Server via Rest API as part of request:

{


  "NodeList": [
      {
          "vnfc_type": "oam",
          "ne_id_vip": "vfdb9904vm001oam001",
          "floating_ip_address_vip": "1xx.2yy.zzz.109",
          "site": "wp0ny",
          "vm_info": [
               {
                   "ne_id": "vfdb9904vm001oam001",
                   "fixed_ip_address": "1xx.2yy.zzz.109"
               },
               {
                   "ne_id": "vfdb9904vm002oam001",
                   "fixed_ip_address": "1xx.2yy.zzz.110"
               }
          ]
      },
      {
          " vnfc_type": "rdb",
          "site": "wp0ny",
          "vm_info": [
               {
                   "ne_id": "vfdb9904vm003rdb001",
                   "fixed_ip_address": "1xx.2yy.zzz.105"
               },
               {
                   "ne_id": "vfdb9904vm004rdb001",
                   "fixed_ip_address": "1xx.2yy.zzz.106"
               }
          ]
      }
  ]


}

With no names, only IP addresses, template “InventoryNames”: “None” (Default)

$ more ../inventory/vfdb9904vhosts
[host]
localhost ansible_connection=local

[oamvip]
1xx.2yy.zzz.108

[oam]
1xx.2yy.zzz.109
1xx.2yy.zzz.110

[rdb]
1xx.2yy.zzz.105
1xx.2yy.zzz.106

[wp0ny:children]
oam
rdb

With VM names and IP addresses, template inventory names setting “InventoryNames”: “VM”

$ more ../inventory/vfdb9904vhosts
[host]
localhost ansible_connection=local

[oamvip]
vfdb9904vm001vip ansible_host=1xx.2yy.zzz.108

[oam]
vfdb9904vm001 ansible_host=1xx.2yy.zzz.109
vfdb9904vm002 ansible_host=1xx.2yy.zzz.110

[rdb]
vfdb9904vm003 ansible_host=1xx.2yy.zzz.105
vfdb9904vm004 ansible_host=1xx.2yy.zzz.106

[wp0ny:children]
oam
rdb

With VM names and IP addresses, template inventory names setting “InventoryNames”: “VNFC”

$ more ../inventory/vfdb9904vhosts
[host]
localhost ansible_connection=local

[oamvip]
vfdb9904vm001oam001vip ansible_host=1xx.2yy.zzz.108

[oam]
vfdb9904vm001oam001 ansible_host=1xx.2yy.zzz.109
vfdb9904vm002oam001 ansible_host=1xx.2yy.zzz.110

[rdb]
vfdb9904vm003rdb001 ansible_host=1xx.2yy.zzz.105
vfdb9904vm004rdb001 ansible_host=1xx.2yy.zzz.106

[wp0ny:children]
oam
rdb

8.5.4. Ansible Server – On-boarding Ansible Playbooks

Once playbooks are developed following these guidelines, playbooks need to be on-boarded onto Development Ansible Server(s), and placed under (git) code control. Once a (git) repository is created for the set of playbooks, playbooks are then pushed to the central repository. Using mechanized identification that leverages SSH key based authentication, a mechanism is in place to regularly clone or pull updates from central repository to runtime Ansible Server Clusters, to perform an automated controlled distribution of playbooks and related artifacts to clustered runtime Ansible Servers.

These are the basic steps to on-board playbooks manually onto the Ansible Server.

  1. Upload CSAR, zip, or tar file containing VNF playbooks and related artifacts to Development Ansible Server with connectivity to central repository.
  2. Create full directory (using –p option below) to store Ansible Playbooks and other artifacts under /storage (or other configured) file system.
    1. Includes VNF type using VNF function code 4 characters under /storage.
    2. Includes VNF “Version” directory as part of the path to store playbooks for this VNF version.
    3. Include generic ansible root directory. Creating full directory path as an example:
$ mkdir –p /storage/vfdb/V16.1/ansible
  1. Make this directory (VNF ansible root directory) current directory for next few steps:
cd /storage/vfdb/V16.1/ansible/
  1. Extract Ansible Playbooks and other Ansible artifacts associated with the playbooks onto the ansible directory. Command depends on the type of file uploaded, examples would be:
tar xvf ..
unzip ...
bunzip ..
  1. Create VNF inventory hosts file with all VMs and OA&M IP addresses, and VM or VNFC names as required for the VNF type, grouped by VM/VNFC type. Add site with all groups as children. Inventory hosts file are required for all VNF instances, to be configured and managed through Ansible. Inventory hosts file example:
$ mkdir inventory

$ touch inventory/vfdb9904vhosts

$ cat inventory/vfdb9904vhosts

[host]
localhost ansible_connection=local

[oamvip]
1xx.2yy.zzz.108

[oam]
1xx.2yy.zzz.109
1xx.2yy.zzz.110

[rdb]
1xx.2yy.zzz.105
1xx.2yy.zzz.106

[wp0ny:children]
oam
rdb

Virtual IP addresses that can be used by multiple VMs, usually, used by the active VM of an active-standby pair, are placed under a group named after the VNFC (VM) type, plus “vip” string, example of such a group name “oamvip”.

  1. (Optional) Create directory to hold default arguments for VNF instance, and respective file(s), when required by VNF type, example:
$ mkdir –p vars/vfdb9904v.json
$
$ cat vfdb9904v.json
...
{
  "json_var1": "vfdb9904v_test_var1",
  "json_var2": "vfdb9904v_test_var2",
  "json_var3": "vfdb9904v_test_var3"
}
...

NOTE: Please note names in this file shall use underscore “_” not dots “.” or dashes “-“.

  1. Perform some basic playbook validation running with “–check” option, running dummy playbooks or other.
  2. Make <VNF version> directory current directory to add playbooks and other artifacts under (git) code control:
cd /storage/vfdb/V16.1

NOTE: After creating the repository for the playbooks in the central repository a list of (git) commands is provided to add playbooks under (git) code control and push them to the newly created repository. Each Ansible Server or cluster of Ansible Servers will have its own credentials to authenticate to VNF VMs. Ansible Server SSH public key(s) have to be loaded onto VNF VMs during instantiation or another way before Ansible Server can access VNF VMs and run playbooks. Heat templates used to instantiate VNFs to be configured by these Ansible Servers running playbooks shall include the same SSH public key and load them onto VNF VM(s) as part of instantiation. Same Ansible Server Cluster SSH public keys are to be added to repositories to provide each authorized cluster access, to clone and pull updates, to each VNF collection of playbooks, from central repository.

Other non-vendor specific playbook tasks need to be incorporated in overall post-instantiation configuration playbook. Alternative is for company developed playbooks to be pushed to repository and executed, after VNF vendor provided playbooks are run.

A couple of playbooks used for proof-of-concept testing as examples:

UpgradePreCheck:

$ pwd
/storage/comx/V5.3.1.3/ansible/upgradeprecheck

$ more site.yml
---

- import_playbook: ../common/create_vars.yml
- import_playbook: ../common/create_hosts.yml

- name: upgrade software pre check
  hosts: oam,dbs,cpm
  gather_facts: no
  become: true
  become_method: sudo
  become_user: root
  max_fail_percentage: 0
  any_errors_fatal: True
  roles:
    - precheck
  tags: precheck

$ more roles/precheck/tasks/main.yml
---

- include_vars: /tmp/{{ vnf_instance }}/all.yml

- name: get software version installed on vnf
  shell: grep "^SW_VERSION =" /vendor/software/config/param_common.cfg | grep -c "{{ existing_software_version }}"
  register: version_line
  ignore_errors: yes

- name: send msg when matches expected version
  debug:  msg="*** OK *** VNF software release matches (old) release to be upgraded."
   verbosity=1
  when: version_line.stdout.find('1') != -1

# send warning message and failure when release is not a match
- fail:
    msg="*** WARNING *** VNF software release does not match expected (pre-upgrade) release."
  when: (version_line | failed) or version_line.stdout.find('1') == -1

UpgradePostCheck:

$ pwd
/storage/comx/V5.3.1.3/ansible/upgradepostcheck

$ more site.yml
---

- import_playbook: ../common/create_vars.yml
- import_playbook: ../common/create_hosts.yml

- name: upgrade software post check
  hosts: oam,dbs,cpm
  gather_facts: no
  become: true
  become_method: sudo
  become_user: root
  max_fail_percentage: 0
  any_errors_fatal: True
  roles:
    - postcheck
  tags: postcheck

$ more roles/postcheck/tasks/main.yml
---

- include_vars: /tmp/{{ vnf_instance }}/all.yml

- name: get post upgrade software version installed on vnf
  shell: grep "^SW_VERSION =" /vendor/software/config/param_common.cfg | grep -c "{{ new_software_version }}"
  register: version_line
  ignore_errors: yes

- name: send msg when matches expected version
  debug:  msg="*** OK *** VNF software release matches new release."
    verbosity=1
  when: version_line.stdout.find('1') != -1

# send warning message and failure when release is not a match
- fail:
    msg="*** WARNING *** VNF software release does not match expected new (post-upgrade) release."
  when: (version_line | failed) or version_line.stdout.find('1') == -1

8.5.5. Ansible Server – Playbook Example to Discover Ansible Server Mechanized User ID

Example of playbook role discovering runtime Ansible Server mechanized user ID and setting it up on target VNF VM(s) with issued and assigned SSH public key with “from=” clause stored onto xxxxx_id_rsa.frompub file:

$ cat roles/setup_ansible_mechid/tasks/main.yml
---

- name: set mechid
  set_fact:
    ansible_mechid: "{{lookup('ini', 'remote_user section=defaults file=/etc/ansible/ansible.cfg') }}"

- name: set mechid uid
  set_fact:
    ansible_mechuid: "{{lookup('ini', 'remote_user section=defaults file=/etc/ansible/ansible.cfg')[1:] }}"

- debug: msg="mechid {{ ansible_mechid }} ansible_mechuid {{ ansible_mechuid }}"
    verbosity=1

# Create ansible server Mech ID group
- group:
    name: "{{ ansible_mechid }}"
    state: present

# add ansible server mech id user
- user:
    name: "{{ ansible_mechid }}"
    group: "{{ ansible_mechid }}"
    state: present
    comment: "Ansible Server Mech ID"
    expires: 99999
    groups: 0
    uid: "{{ ansible_mechuid }}"

- name: create ansible mech id .ssh directory
  file: path=/home/{{ ansible_mechid }}/.ssh owner={{ ansible_mechid }} group={{ ansible_mechid }} mode=0700 state=directory

- name: touch ansible mech id authorized_keys file
  file: path=/home/{{ ansible_mechid }}/.ssh/authorized_keys owner={{ ansible_mechid }} group={{ ansible_mechid }} mode=0600 state=touch

- name: get path to mechid id_rsa.pub
  set_fact:
    public_key: "{{lookup('ini', 'private_key_file section=defaults file=/etc/ansible/ansible.cfg') }}.frompub"
#   public_key: "{{lookup('ini', 'private_key_file section=defaults file=/etc/ansible/ansible.cfg') }}.pub"

- name: setup authorized_keys file
  authorized_key:
    user: "{{ ansible_mechid }}"
    state: present
    key: "{{ lookup('file', '{{ public_key}}') }}"
…